365 Days of Latino Heritage

Latino Heritage Month has been commodified and commercialized with the real meaning behind heritage and history lost in a push to make Latinos spend and make us a brand. We are not a brand. We are not a marketing demographic. We are a complex mescla of people, culturas y lenguas.

Originally this started as a project for Latino Heritage Month, 2009 pero because our lives as Latinos, Latin Americans and the other names we respond to in our hearts are live every day, this is 365 days of Latino heritage.

Compiled and Curated
By Maegan la Mamita Mala Ortiz of VivirLatino
diasporadash:

Slave revolts in Puerto Rico: conspiracies and uprisings, 1795-1873
by Guillermo A. Baralt
From the emergence of the first sugar plantations up until 1873, when slavery was abolished, the wealth amassed by many landowners in Puerto Rico derived mainly from the exploitation of slaves. But slavery generated its antithesis - disobedience, uprisings and flights. This book documents these expressions of collective resistance.

diasporadash:

Slave revolts in Puerto Rico: conspiracies and uprisings, 1795-1873

by Guillermo A. Baralt

From the emergence of the first sugar plantations up until 1873, when slavery was abolished, the wealth amassed by many landowners in Puerto Rico derived mainly from the exploitation of slaves. But slavery generated its antithesis - disobedience, uprisings and flights. This book documents these expressions of collective resistance.

(Source: diasporadash, via latinosexuality)

classicladiesofcolor:

Maria Tallchief
January 24, 1925~April 11, 2013

Ms. Tallchief was the first Native American (she was of the Osage Nation) to become prima ballerina of a major company. 

classicladiesofcolor:

Maria Tallchief

January 24, 1925~April 11, 2013

Ms. Tallchief was the first Native American (she was of the Osage Nation) to become prima ballerina of a major company. 

(via abstrackafricana)

native-detroiter:

afrodiaspores:

Twerking among Black women has recently emerged as a threat—to the “politics of respectability” that associate proficiency in art forms dismissed as “low class”/”ghetto”/”ratchet” with moral turpitude and intellectual degeneracy; to the notion that Black women (both cis and transgender) and gay men adept at dances that focus attention on the torso merit contempt instead of praise; to the belief that if a person (especially young and Black and/or Latino/a) provokes desire, whether purposefully or unwittingly, they/s/he deserves violent exposure to the worst of contemporary “rape culture,” from internet trolling to physical abuse; to the the idea that historically Black innovations (such as AAVE and queer men’s and trans women’s ballroom voguing) exist merely to be decontextualized, commodified, and jokingly imitated, rather than commemorated as collectively affirmed vectors of value and ongoing modes of resistance.

In the online exchanges concerning Black women’s twerking and the subsequent appropriation(s) of it by white performers, some have questioned the extent of its linkages to older African-derived dances. Others know far more about the topic from first-hand experience and have more to offer in terms of analysis. I would like to expand the discussion slightly to draw a few more connections across the African Diaspora—between African-American dances as currently performed and Caribbean movement traditions—than those I have seen elsewhere. For instance, I would propose comparison not only with the “limin,’” “wainin,’” or “winin’” of Jamaica and Trinidad, but also with Cuban dance styles that share with certain West and Central African forms an emphasis on the buttocks as punctuation marks for the narrative told by the legs of the dancer. Rumba guaguancó, with its characteristic thrusting vacunao, is a textbook example.

Another complex of dances that would reward consideration alongside twerking are of Haitian origin (and with which I am unfortunately less familiar, so I apologize in advance for any inaccuracies). For example, the lwa, or spirits, of the Gede clan enjoy dancing the hip-swiveling banda, and seeing it executed for them. Gage Averill relates

The Gedes (including Bawon Samdi/Papa Gede, Grann Brijit, Gede Nibo, Bawon Lakwa, and others) are spirits who guard the secrets of death and the cemetery and also have a special relationship to crossroads. The dance of the Gedes is the highly sexual banda, with its accentuated rolling of the pelvis, and the Gedes have a privileged position from which to interject humor and sexuality into all of their interactions. 

Yvonne Daniel disputes the interpretive focus on sex, arguing that banda communicates the need for “keeping life vital,” but not the importance of banda in ritual practice. While banda performance may also turn explicitly oppositional, as when the Gedes demand resources or rights from the powers-that-be, it is difficult to think of a celebration of survival among people of African descent that would not be—in multiple senses—political.

Similar movements are not confined to ceremonies explicitly centered on the lwa. As in the footage seen above, filmed by Maya Deren between 1947 and 1951, participants in the Lenten (usually Easter Week) festival called Rara visually cite banda and have developed genres of performance that strategically use the hips and hindquarters as tools of expression. The poses struck by these majò jon or ”baton jugglers,” convincingly traced to Kongo precedents, complement the bodily attitudes assumed by the queens” of Rara bands. Elizabeth McAlister observes,

A quality Rara queens seem to share with their hip-hop counterparts is their irreverence toward the dominant culture’s moral stance, which would seek to repress their sexuality as women. Rara queens, as well as rappers and other women artists in Black Atlantic performance traditions, fashion and perform a publicity that projects images of female sexual freedom and economic control. 

She continues:

One common feature of many forms is the celebration of the African female behind. Future scholarship might well look into the possibility that the “bottom-heavy” hip-rotating dances like gouyad, whinin’, and “doin’ da butt” “had one meaning in African culture and came to be integrated into bodily performances of opposition in the American setting.”

At the end of this passage, McAlister quotes Judith Bettelheim’s 1990 paper, Deconstructing the Mythologies: From Priestess to ‘Red Hot Mama’ in African and African American/Caribbean Performances.” This title hints at the work still to be done in order for twerking to be understood more widely as part of a larger family of Diasporic dances, and for its mastery to be appreciated as a unique recombination of skill, knowledge, and kinship.

span

(via blackbeatnik)

thinkmexican:

150 Years of Mexican, Mexican American History Now Online
The UA Libraries has just made 150 years of regionally published newspapers documenting the voice of Mexican and Mexican American communities digitally available for the first time.
A new digital collection at the University of Arizona Libraries makes accessible more than 150 years of news coverage documenting the voice of the Mexican and Mexican American community.
Curated, researched and digitized by librarians and archivists, in consultation with UA professors, the collection features 20 significant Mexican and Mexican American publications, many in Spanish.
The newspapers and magazines were published in Tucson, El Paso, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sonora, Mexico from the mid-1800s to the 1970s.
Read more at UANews.
Visit: The Historic Mexican & Mexican American Press Collection.

thinkmexican:

150 Years of Mexican, Mexican American History Now Online

The UA Libraries has just made 150 years of regionally published newspapers documenting the voice of Mexican and Mexican American communities digitally available for the first time.

A new digital collection at the University of Arizona Libraries makes accessible more than 150 years of news coverage documenting the voice of the Mexican and Mexican American community.

Curated, researched and digitized by librarians and archivists, in consultation with UA professors, the collection features 20 significant Mexican and Mexican American publications, many in Spanish.

The newspapers and magazines were published in Tucson, El Paso, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sonora, Mexico from the mid-1800s to the 1970s.

Read more at UANews.

Visit: The Historic Mexican & Mexican American Press Collection.

(via rincondemicorazon)

Richie Perez Radical Library and Benefit Hip Hop Concert!!!


Friends of Guests · By Rebel Diaz, Claudia De la Cruz and Sky Cohen.

 
Sunday, February 10, 2013.

5:00pm until 8:00pm
 in EST.

478 Austin Place - RDACBX 

DACBX and Bluestockings Books present: The Richie Perez Radical Library and Benefit Hip Hop Concert… Sunday February 10th, 2013 5pm-8pm… 478 Austin Place ( 6 Train to 149th) Come and learn about the new project we are working on… over the last couple of months along with Bluestockings we have gathered hundreds of books on Hip Hop, Politics, Latino/a and Black History, books on Malcolm X, Mumia Abu Jamal, Che Guevara etc… Join us as we raise funds to further move along this project and come check out the books we already have! Time to make books and reading cool again. See u there.
Don’t miss this event!! In honor and celebrating the legacy of Richie Perez… RDAC-BX and Bluestocking Bookstore have come together… We got some very special Surprise Performances, Martha Laureano will be with us… Check it out…
Sliding Scale Donations taken at door….$5, $10, $20

 

comeuppance:

If the administration were serious about DACA approval, they would be approving at a higher rate.

comeuppance:

If the administration were serious about DACA approval, they would be approving at a higher rate.

Latino turnout: The big picture

univisionnews:

The issue of Latino turnout at the polls is complicated, but there’s reason to believe Latinos will play a pivotal role in 2012. 

By EMILY DERUY

Latinos are constantly touted as key players in the upcoming election, even capable of swinging red states like Arizona blue. And there’s little doubt that they can make a difference in the outcome of not only the presidential election, but state and local elections as well.

The real question, though, is will they?

Read More

(Source: thisisfusion)